08/01/2019

LIST: Vaccination recommendations from birth to 18 years old

Although people may have varying opinions, scientific data shows that the current United States vaccine supply is the safest in history.

“Ultimately at the end of the day, it’s still a parent’s choice whether or not to vaccinate,” says Dr. John Rowlett, St. Joseph’s/Candler Director of Pediatric Emergency Medicine. “We all have one concern, one interest, and that’s the safest, healthiest life for our children. These vaccines are safe and effective at preventing some potentially deadly diseases.”

Dr. John Rowlett
Dr. John Rowlett, St. Joseph’s/Candler Director of Pediatric Emergency Medicine

A vaccine is a substance used to provide immunity against one or several diseases. Vaccines play an important role in keeping us healthy. They protect us from serious and sometimes deadly diseases, such as Hepatitis B, influenza, measles, mumps and the list continues.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention constantly monitors and studies vaccines for effectiveness and safety. It also makes yearly recommendations as to the age when a child should receive a routine vaccine.

Here are the current recommendations for routine vaccines by age for normally healthy children:

Birth
Hepatitis B (HepB) – First dose

One Month to Two Months
Hepatitis B (HepB) – Second dose

Two Months
Rotavirus (RV) – First dose
Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) – First dose
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) – First dose
Pneumococcal conjugate – First dose
Inactivated poliovirus (IPV) – First dose

Four Months
Rotavirus (RV) – Second dose
Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) – Second dose
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) – Second dose
Pneumococcal conjugate – Second dose
Inactivated poliovirus (IPV) – Second dose

Six Months
Rotavirus (RV) – Third dose (if your pediatrician recommends the three-dose series)
Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) – Third dose
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) – Third dose (if your pediatrician recommends the three-dose series)
Pneumococcal conjugate – Third dose

Six Months to 18 Months
Hepatitis B (HepB) – Third dose
Inactivated poliovirus (IPV) – Third dose

Six months to Four-Six years
Influenza – Annual vaccination (one or two doses based on your pediatrician’s recommendation)

12 Months to 15 Months
Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) – Third and/or fourth dose (based on your pediatrician’s recommendation)
Pneumococcal conjugate – Fourth dose
Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) – First dose
Varicella (VAR) – First dose

12 Months to 20 Months
Hepatitis A (HepA) – Two dose series given six months apart

15 to 18 Months
Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) – Fourth dose

Four to six years
Diphtheria, tetanus and acellular pertussis (DTaP) – Fifth dose
Inactivated poliovirus (IPV) – Fourth dose
Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) – Second dose
Varicella (VAR) – Second dose

Seven years throughout adulthood
Influenza – Annual vaccination (one dose only)

11 to 12 years
Meningococcal conjugate – First dose
Tetanus, diphtheria and acellular pertussis (Tdap) – One dose

9 years to 14 years at initial vaccination
Human papillomavirus (HPV) – Two doses given six to 12 months apart

15 years or older at initial vaccination
Human papillomavirus (HPV) – Three dose series at 0, 1 to 2 months and then six months

16 years
Meningococcal conjugate – Second dose



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